NECA board looking for new faces

By Cindy Parkanyi, NECA President

From its early days fighting construction of the Vanier Parkway extension to advocating for mitigation and improvements to the park and public spaces, the New Edinburgh Community Alliance gets involved in myriad issues and activities, from inputs on citywide issues (such as zoning by-law changes, official plans and major governance reviews) to more localized issues around heritage, development, traffic, safety, and the environment, to name a few.

All these efforts take time and effort, so the more of us who are willing to participate, the better off we all are. If you or someone you know wants to help address issues in our neighbourhood, or has great ideas to improve it, please consider join the NECA board or one of our committees. To get a better understanding of what’s involved before jumping in, log on to the Annual General Meeting on Oct. 27 at 7 p.m. or join one of the NECA board meetings: every third Tuesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. Currently, all meetings are being held on Zoom and the link is posted in advance at newedinburgh.ca/events. Nominations are open from now until the evening of the AGM: Oct. 27 at 7 p.m. However, we encourage nominations in advance. If you are interested, please email newedinburgh[at]outlook.com

City’s draft Official Plan is worrisome and aggressively anti-urban

By Ray Boomgaardt. This article originally appeared in the April 2021 edition of the New Edinburgh News.

In November 2020, the City of Ottawa published a draft revision of its Official Plan, intended to guide the growth of the city for the next 25 years. It invited public comments on the four volumes (Vol. 1 alone is more than 250 pages long). The Board of the New Edinburgh Community Alliance (NECA) submitted its comments on Mar. 12 (find our submission at newedinburgh.ca). Our City Councillor Rawlson King has invited residents to make any further comments to his office.

The City terms its revisions to its Official Plan as a “New Official Plan.” That’s actually a fair description, because the New Plan reverses many of the policies of the existing Plan. The extreme departure from existing policies is very strange – even bizarre – because the existing Plan is well written, has been regularly updated by Council, and seems to have served the City rather well. The New Plan is full of empty jargon, reverses not only well-established policies but also many recent Council decisions, and attacks fundamental rules and procedures protecting Ottawa’s urban neighbourhoods. 

Having been critical of the City in the past, it feels strange to be suddenly noticing all the merits of the existing Plan. But that is perhaps the easiest way to convey to you, dear reader, how worrisome this revision, the draft New Plan, is. 

Fifty years ago, the ideas of urban-renewal activist Jane Jacobs lead the citizens of Toronto in their campaign to stop the Spadina Expressway. In 1979, those same ideas galvanized New Edinburgh to stop the Vanier Arterial. Perhaps the writers of the New Plan were indulging in some black humour when they decided to label the Queensway, Ottawa’s expressway, a scenic route (yes, really!). But we digress. This article is not about that bit of Orwellian nonsense, although we do think it illustrates how poorly thought out and aggressively anti-urban the New Plan is.

One of NECA’s core values is our commitment to Jacobs’ understanding of what makes a city thriving and liveable: the city is made up of neighbourhoods. The existing Plan, was also explicitly based on this idea. The proposed revised Plan talks about developing “15-minute neighbourhoods,” but then repeatedly undermines urban neighbourhoods.

Let’s look at some examples.

An overview of the Plans

The existing Plan states: “This Plan manages this growth in ways that reinforce the qualities of the city most valued by its residents: its distinctly liveable communities, its green and open character, and its unique characteristics.”… “The environmental integrity of the city is reinforced throughout the Plan.”

The New Plan replaces these four commitments – to community, greenspace, unique characteristics and environment – with a far weaker and vaguer sentence: “we will need to find ways of supporting city neighbourhoods … as healthy, inclusive and vibrant places,” offering vague support for “healthy, inclusive and vibrant places.”

For existing urban areas, “healthy” seems to mean adequate parks and recreation facilities, and might even be construed as a back-handed reference to environmental integrity (i.e., a weakening of existing policy, but not a complete reversal); “inclusive” seems to mean more high-density buildings without lawns or trees (what the Plan calls the “missing middle,” i.e., with no accommodation for communities, greenspace, or unique characteristics); and “vibrant” seems to mean rapidly transforming with high-density infill (the existing Plan supports infill, but doesn’t require it to be dense, and does make it subject to the four commitments.)  

NECA has been fighting for the four commitments in the existing Plan to be respected by new development proposals; the New Plan simply deletes the commitments altogether. 

Secondary plans

NECA and other community associations have done a lot of work on our vision for the development of the Beechwood Avenue corridor. The new draft Official Plan proposes to designate Beechwood from the St. Patrick bridge to Hemlock Road as a “Mainstreet Corridor.” The good part of this proposal is that new projects along the Corridor are required to have ground-level commercial units and to provide extra-wide sidewalks. 

On the other hand, there is a series of additional elements that community associations would like to see included to help ensure appropriate development along Beechwood. Under both the existing Plan and the draft New Plan, secondary development plans can be initiated by the City, and, when approved, become part of the Official Plan. 

However, the draft New Plan introduces a new prerequisite for secondary plans: “the City shall require a landowners’ agreement. This Agreement shall be provided to the City prior to the commencement of the Secondary Plan. The … agreement shall include … how development and density are to be distributed, as well as how the costs of studies and plans will be divided.

In short, landowners who do not agree with a proposed planning process can veto it simply by not signing a landowner’s agreement.

Again, the City has simply deleted the prior ability to receive community input. 

Dealing with growth

The New Plan notes that provincial policy requires the City to designate enough land to account for growth over the next 25 years; and that the City expects to grow to 1.4 million people by 2046, an annual growth rate of about 1.2 per cent.

Over the past 30 years, the number of living units in New Edinburgh has probably grown at a rate of more than 1.2 per cent annually. So you might think that the City would use us as a model for the future. You would be wrong.

The New Plan proposes that 47 per cent of the growth will occur within the existing urban boundary (this is targeted to rise to 60 per cent by 2046, sec 2.2.1(1)), 46 per cent in the currently undeveloped land at the periphery of the urban boundary, and seven per cent in rural areas. So far, so good.

The New Plan goes on to state: “The target amount of dwelling growth represents the proportion of new residential dwelling units, excluding institutional and collective units such as seniors’ and student residences, based upon building permit issuance within the built-up portion of the urban area.”

Apparently, seniors’ units do not count. Really: that’s in the New Plan! New Edinburgh has three long-term care facilities built in the last 30 years. But they wouldn’t count under the New Plan’s math. 

Dealing with intensification

Fun fact: the draft New Plan uses the word “transect” as a noun, with a meaning unknown to either the Oxford or Random House dictionaries.

Here we go. In the inner urban “transect” (which includes New Edinburgh), the New Plan provides that “The minimum residential dwelling density …for each lot” is 80 units per hectare. This intensification requirement would apply to any new construction in New Edinburgh outside the Heritage District. The density requirement along Beechwood Avenue is 80 to 160 units per hectare.

A hectare is 10,000m2. So, at 80 units per hectare, each unit occupies 125 m2, or 1,345ft2.  This is the exterior dimension, so the interior living space on each floor would be about 1,200ftassuming 100 per cent lot coverage. Therefore, if one wants to build a two-storey 1,800fthouse (at 900ftper floor) on a 1,200ft2 lot, there is only 300ftof space for lot setbacks, a deck and parking. For lots that have approximately 15m frontage or wider, at least 50 per cent of the units developed on that lot must have three or more bedrooms. 

If you know the size of lots on your street, you can calculate what requirements a new development would need to meet. If a lot is 50×100 = 5000ft2 (464m2), the building would need to have four units to meet the standard, and two of them would need to have three bedrooms, since the lot is more than 15m wide. Assuming 50 per cent lot coverage, 2500ft2, and three floors, this provides 7,500ft2, or approximately 1,900ft2 for each unit (exterior dimensions).

Remember, these are minimum requirements. Presumably the by-laws will be amended to permit this kind of intensification. 

Conclusion

You tell me. What’s up with City Hall?

Ray Boomgaardt is a board member of the New Edinburgh Community Alliance.

Let’s keep the conversation going about policing

By Samantha McAleese and Marc d’Orgeville. This article originally appeared in the Feb 2021 edition of New Edinburgh News.

Like most community newspapers, the New Edinburgh News provides space to share thoughts, concerns, ideas, and resources that might spark meaningful conversations and connections with neighbours. This article is the result of that particular power of the press. 

In the NEN October edition, Samantha McAleese wrote an article about people experiencing homelessness and living in encampments along the Rideau River. She asked neighbours to connect with community-based services and to advocate for affordable housing instead of relying on the police to respond to poverty and homelessness.

In the December edition, Marc d’Orgeville (chair of the New Edinburgh Community Alliance’s traffic and safety committee) summarized a conversation he had with a community police officer to remind New Edinburgh residents of the process for filing police reports. Advice received from the officer on dealing with issues like break-ins or speeding drivers was to call the police and call them more often, as police rely on community members to be “the eyes on the ground.”  

Samantha received comments about the December article from local advocates, which included: “It sounds like your neighbours are setting up a snitch line,” and “They won’t be happy until there is a cop car on every corner.” These comments were not meant to dismiss the consequences of any violence, conflict, loss, or harm experienced by individuals, but rather to temper the impulse to call the police for every little thing. 

These two articles highlight the need for ongoing conversations about policing and community safety in New Edinburgh and Ottawa. In a neighbourhood as privileged and resourced as New Edinburgh, we should be actively engaged in discussions about the cycle of ever-increasing police funding that does not address root causes of harm, such as poverty.

One conversation started at the December meeting of NECA’s Traffic and Safety Committee, chaired by Marc. Samantha attended the meeting to address concerns and to ask questions about the purpose and intent of Marc’s article. Marc had not imagined that a reminder for residents to report local incidents to the police would elicit such a strong reaction, but he welcomed the opportunity for this more critical discussion around policing. 

As a reactive service, the police rely on calls and reporting to respond to incidents and decide how to allocate resources. Unfortunately, calling the police does not always resolve the problem or make us feel safer. Furthermore, over-reporting maintains the impression that increasing police resources in our community is a viable solution to preventing harm. The need for alternatives to the police is clear and requires strong advocacy. 


Marc and Samantha’s conversation illuminated not conflict but rather commonalities in how we think about police and community safety. For example, we both support City Councillor Rawlson King’s decision to vote against a budget increase for the Ottawa Police Service. Like Rawlson, we both agree with de-tasking the Ottawa Police Service. Armed police officers are not a suitable response to mental health crises, nor do police play a role in preventing or ending homelessness. Additionally, we (along with others in New Edinburgh) appreciate the councillor’s ongoing advocacy for additional funding for social services, supports, and resources that prioritize community care. Finally, we look forward to supporting Rawlson’s work on the poverty reduction strategy for Rideau-Rockcliffe. 


The initial meeting ended with an agreement to keep the conversation going between NECA and all neighbours in the Burgh. Together, we can continue to advocate for programs, resources, supports, and responses that keep care at the forefront. This advocacy is vital for Black, Indigenous, racialized, and unhoused neighbours who are at an increased risk of experiencing police violence and being criminalized. 

One way to advocate is to participate in public consultations. The City of Ottawa has begun Phase 2 of their consultation process for the Community Safety and Well-Being Plan, and we encourage Burgh residents to participate online: engage.ottawa.ca/Community-Safety-Well-Being-Plan.

For a lot of people (especially white people), 2020 was a year of listening and learning more intently about the desperate need for alternatives to policing from BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Colour) communities. Affordable housing, mental health supports, safe consumption sites, additional public health resources, youth leadership programs, and community-led conflict resolution and restorative justice options are just a few examples. Let 2021 be the year of acting on these calls for transformation.

NECA’s Traffic and Safety committee meetings take place at 7 p.m. every fourth Monday of the month – the next meeting is Feb. 22. Anyone interested in attending should contact marc.dorgeville@utoronto.ca.


Samantha McAleese is a researcher and advocate who lives in New EdinburghMarc d’Orgeville is the chair of NECA’s Traffic and Safety committee.

Ward Boundary Review Under Way

The next round of Public Consultations for the Ottawa Ward Boundary Review is underway. This round of consultation is focused on gathering resident feedback on six options. We encourage everyone to review the six options and let us know what you think.  We will be discussing these at the September 15 NECA meeting, in advance of a meeting of community association representatives with the City on Sept 21.

The city has also been hosting a series of public consultations. 

The final citywide consultation takes place Saturday, Sept 19 from 10 am to noon. There is also on urban-focussed session on Wednesday, September 23 from 7 to 9 pm.

Registration for the virtual public meetings listed above is required. Please complete and submit the registration as early as possible or at least one day prior to the start of the session you would like to attend. Following receipt of your registration, the consultant team will provide you with information and login details for the virtual meeting. You can also register over the phone, by calling 613-580-3620.

You may also provide your feedback through an online survey from Wednesday, August 19, 2020, to Friday, September 25, 2020, during Round 2 of the public consultation for the Ottawa Ward Boundary Review 2020. A ranking tool opens in a new tab or window is also available to assist residents, stakeholders and Members of Council in ranking the six ward boundary Options.  If you don’t have access to a computer or require a hardcopy survey, please call 613-580-3620.

New Edinburgh Heritage Walking Trail

New Edinburgh Heritage Walking Trail Map

In 2008, a heritage walking tour was published in the New Edinburgh News. Based on popular demand, the brochure was updated and published as a brochure — in English and French — highlighting New Edinburgh’s heritage credentials by means of a self-guided walking trail. It connects together all 17 of the individually-designated heritage buildings in the neighbourhood, 16 of which are located within the HCD.

Preparation of the brochure was a major undertaking involving several community volunteers. The photographs were taken by Louise Imbeault, the fine ink sketches were drawn by John Farmer, and the two maps were prepared by Clare Robertson. Translation was undertaken by Anne-Sophie Belzile, production was coordinated by Cindy Parkanyi, and Katherine Arkay worked on sponsorship, distribution, and a whole lot more.

In April 2020, we re-printed the Walking Tour in the New Edinburgh News. For those who missed it, we also offer electronic versions via the links below. Feel free to download and take a stroll through our neighbourhood’s history.

COVID-19 Town Hall – June 22

Town Hall

Join us this Monday, June 22nd at 7:30PM for a public assembly with all three levels of government in Ottawa-Vanier. The Honourable Mona Fortier, Member of Parliament for Ottawa—Vanier, Lucille Collard, Member of Provincial Parliament for Ottawa—Vanier, and Rawlson King, municipal councillor for Rideau-Rockcliffe, will provide an update on the situation within their respective governments and answer the community’s questions regarding COVID-19.

See event listing for registration details.

Local Businesses During COVID-19

The listings below are neither comprehensive, nor an endorsement, and are provided simply as a resource. If you have updates, please send them to neds@newedinburgh.ca.

Grocery and Food Services

Bibi’s Middle Eastern KitchenOPEN, reduced hours (noon-8 pm); Take Out or Delivery on Local Love Delivery (no in store seating); 613-421-0711 www.eatatbibis.com.
Bread and Roses BakeryOPEN, reduced store hours 8 am-6 pm, Monday-Saturday; 8 am – 5 pm. Sunday, visit https://www.facebook.com/breadandrosesottawa/ for updates.
Bridgehead Coffee HouseCLOSED, online coffee bag and coffee pod orders, with free delivery: https://www.bridgehead.ca/collections/coffee.
Clocktower Brew PubCLOSED
EpicuriaOPEN, reduced hours Tuesday-Friday 10 am-5:30 pm; Saturday 9:30 am-2:30 pm; Sunday Closed; Monday- Delivery and Curbside Pick-Up only; 613-745-7356.
Ferme Lève-Tôt CSA DeliveriesBeginning in June.
Fraser CaféCLOSED but offers pre-order, prepayment Take Away meals, through Love Local Delivery; Tuesday and Friday, 4:00-7:00 p.m., info@frasercafe.ca or 613-749-1444: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
GoodFoodToUONLINE ordering and HOME DELIVERY
Il VagabondoCLOSED
Jacobson’sOPEN, open for in-store, phone order and online purchases, plus local delivery when possible; 613-746-6002 or https://jacobsons.ca/collections/specialty-food.
Jasper RestaurantCLOSED
LoblawsOPEN, reduced regular store hours 8 am-8 pm, plus designated hour for seniors and those at high risk 7 am-8 am; online purchases for pick up at www.pcexpress.ca; quantity restrictions as needed.
MetroOPEN, reduced store hours 8 am-8 pm; Deliveries for in-store purchases Monday-Saturday, 10 am-5 pm; quantity restrictions as needed.
Ministry of CoffeeCLOSED
Muckleston & BrockwellOPEN – limited hours
Nature’s BuzzOPEN, reduced hours 9 am-6 pm Monday through Saturday; 11 am-5 pm Sunday.
Ola CocinaCLOSED System of Pre-Order Take Out/Delivery Service (through Love Local Delivery) coming soon 613-746-6222 www.olacocina.ca.
One Up BeechwoodCLOSED
Quickie Convenience StoreOPEN
Red Door ProvisionsCLOSED but online sale of coffee, preserves and Red Door products available: email lauren@reddoorprovisions.com
Royal Oak TavernCLOSED
Scone Witch  CLOSED – phone orders and home delivery from Cyrville location 613-744-2585; visit https://www.facebook.com/sconewitch/ for updates and Home Delivery Menu.
Second CupOPEN for TAKE-OUT and DELIVERY ONLY
So Good Asian FusionOPEN for take out service; reduced hours.
StarbucksOPEN, reduced hours 7 am- 7 pm, Take Out service (no in-store seating).
SubwayOPEN for TAKE OUT and DELIVERY
SushiMeOPEN FOR TAKE OUT ONLY
Tea TymeCLOSED
Union Street CaféCLOSED

There is also a Local Eats listing of restaurants across Ottawa offering food delivery and pick up options.

Online delivery resources:

InstacartDelivery from Staples, Superstore, Walmart, Loblaws, Shopper’s Drug Mart and others.
InabuggyDelivery from Metro, Costco, Petsmart, Loblaws, M&M, Canadian Tire and others. Has an app.

Pharmacies

Beechwood Whole Health PharmacyOPEN – 222 Beechwood 613-842-7455.
New Edinburgh Pharmacy – GuardianOPEN – Monday-Friday 8:30 am-8:30 pm, Saturday 9 am-5 pm, Sunday 10 am-2 pm; Contact 613-749-4444 for updates on store hours.

Other

Activa PhysiotherapyCLOSED but available for phone consultation.
Anytime FitnessCLOSED
Bank of MontrealOPEN
Beechwood Animal HospitalOPEN but with special protocols in place.
Beechwood Auto ServiceOPEN for appointments only.
Beechwood CemeteryOPEN but with reduced hours and special protocols
Bellefleur PhysiotherapyCLOSED
Books on BeechwoodCLOSED but phone, email or online orders still accepted: 613-742-5030; staff@booksonbeechwood.ca; deliveries via Purolator or Canada Post, or Store Pick by pre-arrangement.
Brown’s CleanersOPEN but call to confirm hours – also have free pickup and delivery
Clothes Encounters of a Second TimeCLOSED
Dr. John Martins (Dentistry)CLOSED
Dr. Luc Ducharme (Dentistry)CLOSED
Edward Jones InvestmentsCLOSED – Virtual meetings only
Epic FitnessCLOSED – online personal training and group classes via https://www.facebook.com/epicfitnessottawa/; online Personal Training, Lifestyle Coaching, Nutritional Counseling: email kathleen@epicfitnessottawa.com; EPIC Street Service – free delivery of naturopathic supplements, fitness equipment, Monday-Friday: email orders frontdesk@epicfitnessottawa.com.
Fresh Hair SalonCLOSED
Imperial Barber ShopCLOSED
Joe’s Shoe RepairCLOSED
Kelly’s Barber and BeautyCLOSED (GIFT CARDS available online)
Kimberley Wilson Bridal & FashionCLOSED
Marilyn Wilson Dream PropertiesCLOSED – Agents are available by phone.
Matnik Spa TherapyCLOSED
Medjo-Da Hair CuttingCLOSED
Mille Fiore FlowersCLOSED
Monson’s Deluxe CleanersOPEN – limited hours 8 am-3 pm Monday-Friday; 9 am-2 pm Saturday (status to be reassessed in first week of April).
Mood Moss FlowersOPEN – 11 am-4 pm daily; visit https://www.facebook.com/MoodMossFlowers/ for updates on store hours and operations.
Nature’s Care Health ProductsOPEN – Monday-Saturday 10 am-6 pm.
Nuvo OptometryCLOSED
Oresta Organic Skin CareCLOSED  – Online purchases only
Physical Therapy InstituteCOVID-19 protocols in operation; 613-740-0380.
Pet ValuOPEN
Rassi CoiffureCLOSED
Rowat InsuranceCLOSED – Virtual meetings only
Studio One PhysiotherapyCLOSED – Check for updates.
The Movement UnionCLOSED but online exercise classes via Facebook https://www.facebook.com/themovementunion/.
Victoria Island RealtyTBD
Your Pet PalaceCLOSED

Ontario Government List of Essential Businesses

How to support local business through COVID-19 (Quartier Vanier BIA).

New Edinburgh Disaster Support – COVID-19

A New Edinburgh Disaster Support (NEDS) team focused on developing localized response mechanisms and to facilitate access to information and resources in the event of a crisis has been formed.  For the current crisis, the NEDS team has compiled COVID-19 information resources and is looking for volunteers willing to provide assistance to those who cannot leave their homes (e.g. picking up groceries or medications).